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A Sporting Time

A Sporting Time PDF
Author: Melvin Leonard Adelman
Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press
ISBN:
Size: 70.97 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 388
View: 4901

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Traces the development of modern sports in nineteenth-century New York, including baseball, cricket, horse and harness racing, yachting, billiards, and boxing, and describes the emergence of national standards and commercial involvement

Sports In American Life

Sports in American Life PDF
Author: Richard O. Davies
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118912454
Size: 11.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 504
View: 1898

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The third edition of author Richard O. Davies highly praised narrative of American sports, Sports in American Life: A History, features extensive revisions and updates to its presentation of an interpretative history of the relationship of sports to the larger themes of U.S. history. Updated include a new section on concussions caused by contact sports and new biographies of John Wooden and Joe Paterno. Features extensive revisions and updates, along with a leaner, faster-paced narrative than previous editions Addresses the social, economic, and cultural interaction between sports and gender, race, class, and other larger issues Provides expanded coverage of college sports, women in sports, race and racism in organized sports, and soccers sharp rise in popularity Features an all-new section that tackles the growing controversy of head injuries and concussions caused by contact sports

Never Just A Game

Never Just a Game PDF
Author: Robert F. Burk
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807860646
Size: 45.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 302
View: 5858

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America's national pastime has been marked from its inception by bitter struggles between owners and players over profit, power, and prestige. In this book, the first installment of a highly readable, comprehensive labor history of baseball, Robert Burk describes the evolution of the ballplaying work force: its ethnocultural makeup, its economic position, and its battles for a place at the table in baseball's decision-making structure. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the growing popularity of baseball as a spectator sport and the dramatic upsurge of America's urban population created conditions that led to franchise competition, the development of rival leagues, and trade wars, in turn triggering boom-and-bust cycles, franchise bankruptcies, and league mergers. According to Burk, players repeatedly tried to use these circumstances to better their economic positions by playing one team off against another. Their successes proved short-lived, however, because their own internal divisions, exploited by management, undercut attempts to create collective-bargaining institutions. By 1920, owners still held the upper hand in the labor-management battle, but as today's sports pages show, owners did not secure a long-term solution to their labor problems.

The New American Sport History

The New American Sport History PDF
Author: S. W. Pope
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252065675
Size: 34.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 423
View: 590

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In The New American Sport History sixteen scholars, many of them among the best known in the field, explore topics as diverse as the historical debate over black athletic superiority, the "selling" of sport in society, the eroticism of athletic activity, sexual fears of women athletes, and the marketing of the marathon. In line with the changing nature of sport history as a field of study, this volume focuses less on "traditional" topics and more on themes of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and national identity, which also define the larger parameters of social and cultural history. It is the first anthology to situation sport history within the broader fields of social history and cultural studies. Contributors are Melvin L. Adelman, William J. Baker, Pamela L. Cooper, Mark Dyreson, Gerald R. Gems, Elliott J. Gorn, Allen Guttmann, Stephen H. Hardy, Peter Levine, Donald J. Mrozek, Michael Oriard, S. W. Pope, Benjamin G. Rader, Steven A. Riess, Nancy L. Struna, and David K. Wiggins.

The Sporting World Of The Modern South

The Sporting World of the Modern South PDF
Author: Patrick B. Miller
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252070365
Size: 51.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 355
View: 4589

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Engaging a medley of perspectives and methodologies, The Sporting World of the Modern South examines how sports map the social, political, and cultural landscapes of the modern South. In essays on the "backcountry" fighter stereotypes portrayed in modern professional wrestling and the significance of Crimson Tide coaching legend Paul "Bear" Bryant for white Alabamians, contributors explore the symbols that have shaped southern regional identities since the Civil War. Other essays tackle gender and race relations in intercollegiate athletics, uncover the roles athletic competitions played in desegregating the South, and address the popularity of NASCAR in the southern states. Pairing the action and anecdotes of good sports writing with rock-solid scholarship, The Sporting World of the Modern South adds historical and anthropological perspectives to legends and lore from the gridiron to the racetrack. This collection, with its innovative attention to the interplay between athletics and regional identity, is an insightful and compelling contribution to southern and sports history.

Patriotic Games

Patriotic Games PDF
Author: S. W. Pope
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195358018
Size: 69.51 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 240
View: 5194

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In Patriotic Games, historian Stephen Pope explores the ways sport was transformed from a mere amusement into a metaphor for American life. Between the 1890s and the 1920s, sport became the most pervasive popular cultural activity in American society. During these years, basketball was invented, football became a mass spectator event, and baseball soared to its status as the "national pasttime." Pope demonstrates how America's sporting tradition emerged from a society fractured along class, race, ethnic, and gender lines. Institutionalized sport became a trans- class mechanism for packaging power and society in preferred ways--it popularized an interlocking set of cultural ideas about America's quest for national greatness. Nowhere was this more evident than the intimate connection established between sport and national holiday celebrations. As Pope reveals, Thanksgiving sports influenced the holiday's evolution from a religious occasion to a secular one. On the Fourth of July, sporting events infused patriotic rituals with sentiments that emphasized class conciliation and ethnic assimilation. In a time of social tensions, economic downturns, and unprecedented immigration, the rituals and enthusiasms of sport, Pope argues, became a central component in the shaping of America's national identity.

American National Pastimes A History

American National Pastimes   A History PDF
Author: Mark Dyreson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317572696
Size: 54.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 288
View: 4650

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When the colonies that became the USA were still dominions of the British Empire they began to imagine their sporting pastimes as finer recreations than even those enjoyed in the motherland. From the war of independence and the creation of the republic to the twenty-first century, sporting pastimes have served as essential ingredients in forging nationhood in American history. This collection gathers the work of an all-star team of historians of American sport in order to explore the origins and meanings of the idea of national pastimes—of a nation symbolized by its sports. These wide-ranging essays analyze the claims of particular sports to national pastime status, from horse racing, hunting, and prize fighting in early American history to baseball, basketball, and football more than two centuries later. These essays also investigate the legal, political, economic, and culture patterns and the gender, ethnic, racial, and class dynamics of national pastimes, connecting sport to broader historical themes. American National Pastimes chronicles how and why the USA has used sport to define and debate the contours of nation. This book was published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.

The Field

The Field PDF
Author: Douglas Booth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134459386
Size: 73.50 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 7564

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2006 North American Society for Sports History Book of the Year The literature on sport history is now well established, taking in a wide range of themes and covering every activity from aerobics to zorbing. However, in comparison to most mainstream histories, sport history has rarely been called upon to question its foundations and account for the basis of its historical knowledge. In this book, Booth offers a rigorous assessment of sport history as an academic discipline, exploring the ways in which professional historians can gather materials, construct and examine evidence, and present their arguments about the sporting past. Part 1 examines theories of knowledge, while Part 2 goes on to scrutinize the uses of historical knowledge in popular and academic studies of sport history. With clear structure, examples, summary tables and a detailed glossary, The Field provides students, teachers and researchers with an unparalleled resource to tackle issues fundamental to the future of their subject, and sets the agenda for the debate to come.

The Making Of Sporting Cultures

The Making of Sporting Cultures PDF
Author: John Hughson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317990692
Size: 68.11 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 152
View: 2658

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The Making of Sporting Cultures presents an analysis of western sport by examining how the collective passions and feelings of people have contributed to the making of sport as a ‘way of life’. The popularity of sport is so pronounced in some cases that we speak of certain sports as ‘national pastimes’. Baseball in the United States, soccer in Britain and cricket in the Caribbean are among the relevant examples discussed. Rather than regarding the historical development of sport as the outcome of passive spectator reception, this work is interested in how sporting cultures have been made and developed over time through the active engagement of its enthusiasts. This is to study the history of sport not only ‘from below’, but also ‘from within’, as a means to understanding the ‘deep relationship’ between sport and people within class contexts – the middle class as well as the working class. Contestation over the making of sport along axes of race, gender and class are discussed where relevant. A range of cultural writers and theorists are examined in regard to both how their writing can help us understand the making of sport and as to how sport might be located within an overall cultural context – in different places and times. The book will appeal to students and academics within humanities disciplines such as cultural studies, history and sociology and to those in sport studies programmes interested in the historical, cultural and social aspects of sport. This book was published as a special issue of Sport in Society.

Essays On Sport History And Sport Mythology

Essays on Sport History and Sport Mythology PDF
Author: Allen Guttmann
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9780890964545
Size: 75.28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 154
View: 4360

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Sport has always been a legitimate focus for human energy, and in the last fifteen years it has emerged as a legitimate focus for scholarly energy as well. In this interdisciplinary overview of the study of sport, sociology, intellectual history, psychology, anthropology, and literature are brought to bear in seeking new understanding of the role and significance of sport in society. Some of the conclusions will be controversial or even disturbing, and the breadth of the volume clearly demonstrates that sport history is not merely a hobby. As Jack W. Berryman notes in the introduction to the volume: “Each essay, in some distinctive manner, confronts the problem of general preconceptions and misconceptions in the study of sport history. The authors ask fundamental questions: what is sport, what is its significance over time, and how can sport be studied effectively?” Donald G. Kyle opens the questions with an examination of the myth of the decline of ancient Greek sport. Stephen Hardy proposes a new model for the interpretation of both early and modern sport. Steven A. Riess questions the historicity of the myth of social mobility through sport in America. Richard D. Mandell explains the history of theoretically profound and earnest modern criticism of sport. Allen Guttmann demythologizes the relationship between erotic impulses and sport. This serious and timely study of sport aids in the reevaluation of many popular beliefs and traditional scholarly interpretations concerning sport in various ages and cultures. It offers much of value to all those interested in contemplating the nature and history of the phenomenon of sport.