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Forensic Medicine And Death Investigation In Medieval England

Forensic Medicine and Death Investigation in Medieval England PDF
Author: Sara M. Butler
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317610253
Size: 72.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 312
View: 3465

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England has traditionally been understood as a latecomer to the use of forensic medicine in death investigation, lagging nearly two-hundred years behind other European authorities. Using the coroner's inquest as a lens, this book hopes to offer a fresh perspective on the process of death investigation in medieval England. The central premise of this book is that medical practitioners did participate in death investigation – although not in every inquest, or even most, and not necessarily in those investigations where we today would deem their advice most pertinent. The medieval relationship with death and disease, in particular, shaped coroners' and their jurors' understanding of the inquest's medical needs and led them to conclusions that can only be understood in context of the medieval world's holistic approach to health and medicine. Moreover, while the English resisted Southern Europe's penchant for autopsies, at times their findings reveal a solid understanding of internal medicine. By studying cause of death in the coroners' reports, this study sheds new light on subjects such as abortion by assault, bubonic plague, cruentation, epilepsy, insanity, senescence, and unnatural death.

Pain Penance And Protest

Pain  Penance  and Protest PDF
Author: Sara M. Butler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781316512388
Size: 71.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 459
View: 4556

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In medieval England, a defendant who refused to plead to a criminal indictment was sentenced to pressing with weights as a coercive measure. Using peine forte et dure ('strong and hard punishment') as a lens through which to analyse the law and its relationship with Christianity, Butler asks: where do we draw the line between punishment and penance? And, how can pain function as a vehicle for redemption within the common law? Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, this book embraces both law and literature. When Christ is on trial before Herod, he refused to plead, his silence signalling denial of the court's authority. England's discontented subjects, from hungry peasant to even King Charles I himself, stood mute before the courts in protest. Bringing together penance, pain and protest, Butler breaks down the mythology surrounding peine forte et dure and examines how it functioned within the medieval criminal justice system.

Medicine And Justice

Medicine and Justice PDF
Author: Katherine D. Watson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000765377
Size: 43.11 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 312
View: 1986

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This monograph makes a major new contribution to the historiography of criminal justice in England and Wales by focusing on the intersection of the history of law and crime with medical history. It does this through the lens provided by one group of historical actors, medical professionals who gave evidence in criminal proceedings. They are the means of illuminating the developing methods and personnel associated with investigating and prosecuting crime in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when two linchpins of modern society, centralised policing and the adversarial criminal trial, emerged and matured. The book is devoted to two central questions: what did medical practitioners contribute to the investigation of serious violent crime in the period 1700 to 1914, and what impact did this have on the process of criminal justice? Drawing on the details of 2,600 cases of infanticide, murder and rape which occurred in central England, Wales and London, the book offers a comparative long-term perspective on medico-legal practice – that is, what doctors actually did when they were faced with a body that had become the object of a criminal investigation. It argues that medico-legal work developed in tandem with and was shaped by the needs of two evolving processes: pre-trial investigative procedures dominated successively by coroners, magistrates and the police; and criminal trials in which lawyers moved from the periphery to the centre of courtroom proceedings. In bringing together for the first time four groups of specialists – doctors, coroners, lawyers and police officers – this study offers a new interpretation of the processes that shaped the modern criminal justice system.

Cognitive Sciences And Medieval Studies

Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies PDF
Author: Juliana Dresvina
Publisher: University of Wales Press
ISBN: 1786836750
Size: 73.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 336
View: 3030

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With the rapid development of the cognitive sciences and their importance to how we contemplate questions about the mind and society, recent research in the humanities has been characterised by a ‘cognitive turn’. For their part, the humanities play an important role in forming popular ideas of the human mind and in analysing the way cognitive, psychological and emotional phenomena are experienced in time and space. This collection aims to inspire medievalists and other scholars within the humanities to engage with the tools and investigative methodologies deriving from cognitive sciences. Contributors explore topics including medieval and modern philosophy of mind, the psychology of religion, the history of psychological medicine and the re-emergence of the body in cognition. What is the value of mapping how neurons fire when engaging with literature and art? How can we understand psychological stress as a historically specific phenomenon? What can medieval mystics teach us about contemplation and cognition?

Felony And The Guilty Mind In Medieval England

Felony and the Guilty Mind in Medieval England PDF
Author: Elizabeth Papp Kamali
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108498795
Size: 58.44 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 350
View: 2340

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Explores the role of criminal intent in constituting felony in the first two centuries of the English criminal trial jury.

Death In Medieval Europe

Death in Medieval Europe PDF
Author: Joelle Rollo-Koster
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315466848
Size: 73.75 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 5903

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Death in Medieval Europe: Death Scripted and Death Choreographed explores new cultural research into death and funeral practices in medieval Europe and demonstrates the important relationship between death and the world of the living in the Middle Ages. Across ten chapters, the articles in this volume survey the cultural effects of death. This volume explores overarching topics such as burials, commemorations, revenants, mourning practices and funerals, capital punishment, suspiscious death, and death registrations using case studies from across Europe including England, Iceland, and Spain. Together these chapters discuss how death was ritualised and choreographed, but also how it was expressed in writing throughout various documentary sources including wills and death registries. In each instance, records are analysed through a cultural framework to better understand the importance of the authors of death and their audience. Drawing together and building upon the latest scholarship, this book is essential reading for all students and academics of death in the medieval period.

A Year In The Life Of Medieval England

A Year in the Life of Medieval England PDF
Author: Toni Mount
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445652404
Size: 33.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 245

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The perfect almanac for lovers of all things medieval

Law And Society In Later Medieval England And Ireland

Law and Society in Later Medieval England and Ireland PDF
Author: Travis R. Baker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317107764
Size: 22.80 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 280
View: 1322

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Law mattered in later medieval England and Ireland. A quick glance at the sources suggests as much. From the charter to the will to the court roll, the majority of the documents which have survived from later medieval England and Ireland, and medieval Europe in general, are legal in nature. Yet despite the fact that law played a prominent role in medieval society, legal history has long been a marginal subject within medieval studies both in Britain and North America. Much good work has been done in this field, but there is much still to do. This volume, a collection of essays in honour of Paul Brand, who has contributed perhaps more than any other historian to our understanding of the legal developments of later medieval England and Ireland, is intended to help fill this gap. The essays collected in this volume, which range from the twelfth to the sixteenth century, offer the latest research on a variety of topics within this field of inquiry. While some consider familiar topics, they do so from new angles, whether by exploring the underlying assumptions behind England’s adoption of trial by jury for crime or by assessing the financial aspects of the General Eyre, a core institution of jurisdiction in twelfth- and thirteenth-century England. Most, however, consider topics which have received little attention from scholars, from the significance of judges and lawyers smiling and laughing in the courtroom to the profits and perils of judicial office in English Ireland. The essays provide new insights into how the law developed and functioned within the legal profession and courtroom in late medieval England and Ireland, as well as how it pervaded the society at large.

Making Murder Public

Making Murder Public PDF
Author: K. J. Kesselring
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192572598
Size: 67.96 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 224
View: 5358

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Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of homicides individuals perpetrated on each other. Making Murder Public explores connections between these two changes. It demonstrates the value in distinguishing between murder and manslaughter, or at least in seeing how that distinction came to matter in a period which also witnessed dramatic drops in the occurrence of homicidal violence. Focused on the 'politics of murder', Making Murder Public examines how homicide became more effectively criminalized between 1480 and 1680, with chapters devoted to coroners' inquests, appeals and private compensation, duels and private vengeance, and print and public punishment. The English had begun moving away from treating homicide as an offence subject to private settlements or vengeance long before other Europeans, at least from the twelfth century. What happened in the early modern period was, in some ways, a continuation of processes long underway, but intensified and refocused by developments from 1480 to 1680. Making Murder Public argues that homicide became fully 'public' in these years, with killings seen to violate a 'king's peace' that people increasingly conflated with or subordinated to the 'public peace' or 'public justice.'

Crossing Borders Boundaries And Margins In Medieval And Early Modern Britain

Crossing Borders  Boundaries and Margins in Medieval and Early Modern Britain PDF
Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004364951
Size: 13.39 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 308
View: 1375

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The twelve essays in Crossing Borders: Boundaries and Margins in Medieval and Early Modern Britain examine marches and margins as jurisdictional, legal, and social expressions of power, building upon the scholarship of Professor Cynthia J. Neville.

Law And The Dead

Law and the Dead PDF
Author: Marc Trabsky
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351240390
Size: 18.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 131
View: 3330

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The governance of the dead in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries gave rise to a new arrangement of thanato-politics in the West. Legal, medical and bureaucratic institutions developed innovative technologies for managing the dead, maximising their efficacy and exploiting their vitality. Law and the Dead writes a history of their institutional life in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. With a particular focus on the technologies of the death investigation process, including place-making, the forensic gaze, bureaucratic manuals, record-keeping and radiography, this book examines how the dead came to be incorporated into legal institutions in the modern era. Drawing on the writings of philosophers, historians and legal theorists, it offers tools for thinking through how the dead dwell in law, how their lives persist through the conduct of office, and how coroners assume responsibility for taking care of the dead. This historical and interdisciplinary book offers a provocative challenge to conventional thinking about the sequestration of the dead in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It asks the reader to think through and with legal institutions when writing a history of the dead, and to trace the important role assumed by coroners in the governance of the dead. This book will be of interest to scholars working in law, history, sociology and criminology.

Wounds And Wound Repair In Medieval Culture

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture PDF
Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004306455
Size: 79.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 672
View: 3621

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This volume brings together essays that consider wounding and/or wound repair from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe.

Dealing With The Dead

Dealing With The Dead PDF
Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004358331
Size: 10.11 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 480
View: 3488

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From revenant legends to the regulation of burial space; from martyrologies to accounts of murder; and from the danse macabre to funerals both lavish and simple, this volume examines how communities dealt with their dead as continual, albeit non-living members.

Medieval Historical Writing

Medieval Historical Writing PDF
Author: Jennifer Jahner
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316732207
Size: 30.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages :
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History writing in the Middle Ages did not belong to any particular genre, language or class of texts. Its remit was wide, embracing the events of antiquity; the deeds of saints, rulers and abbots; archival practices; and contemporary reportage. This volume addresses the challenges presented by medieval historiography by using the diverse methodologies of medieval studies: legal and literary history, art history, religious studies, codicology, the history of the emotions, gender studies and critical race theory. Spanning one thousand years of historiography in England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland, the essays map historical thinking across literary genres and expose the rich veins of national mythmaking tapped into by medieval writers. Additionally, they attend to the ways in which medieval histories crossed linguistic and geographical borders. Together, they trace multiple temporalities and productive anachronisms that fuelled some of the most innovative medieval writing.

New Studies In Medieval And Renaissance Gda Sk Poland And Prussia

New Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Gda  sk  Poland and Prussia PDF
Author: Beata Możejko
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351805444
Size: 71.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 216
View: 4585

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New Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Poland and Prussia: The Impact of Gdańsk draws together the latest reseach conducted by local historians and archaeologists on the city of Gdańsk and its impact on the surrounding region of Pomerania and Poland as a whole. Beginning with Gdańsk’s early political history and extending from the 10th to the 16th century, its twelve chapters explore a range of political, social, and socio-cultural historical questions and explain such phenomena as the establishment and development of the Gdańsk port and city. A prominent theme is a consideration of the interactions between Gdansk and Poland and Prussia, including a look into the city’s links with the State of the Teutonic Order in Prussia and the Kingdom of Poland under the rule of the Piast and Jagiellonian dynasties. The chapters are placed in the historical context of medieval Poland as well as the broader themes of religion, the matrimonial policy of noble families or their contacts with the papacy. This book is an exciting new study of medieval Poland and unparalleled in the English-speaking world, making it an ideal text for those wanting to deepen their knowledge in this subject area.

Afterlives

Afterlives PDF
Author: Nancy Mandeville Caciola
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501703463
Size: 67.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 384
View: 1749

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Simultaneously real and unreal, the dead are people, yet they are not. The society of medieval Europe developed a rich set of imaginative traditions about death and the afterlife, using the dead as a point of entry for thinking about the self, regeneration, and loss. These macabre preoccupations are evident in the widespread popularity of stories about the returned dead, who interacted with the living both as disembodied spirits and as living corpses or revenants. In Afterlives, Nancy Mandeville Caciola explores this extraordinary phenomenon of the living's relationship with the dead in Europe during the five hundred years after the year 1000. Caciola considers both Christian and pagan beliefs, showing how certain traditions survived and evolved over time, and how attitudes both diverged and overlapped through different contexts and social strata. As she shows, the intersection of Christian eschatology with various pagan afterlife imaginings—from the classical paganisms of the Mediterranean to the Germanic, Celtic, Slavic, and Scandinavian paganisms indigenous to northern Europe—brought new cultural values about the dead into the Christian fold as Christianity spread across Europe. Indeed, the Church proved surprisingly open to these influences, absorbing new images of death and afterlife in unpredictable fashion. Over time, however, the persistence of regional cultures and beliefs would be counterbalanced by the effects of an increasingly centralized Church hierarchy. Through it all, one thing remained constant: the deep desire in medieval people to bring together the living and the dead into a single community enduring across the generations.