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Humanitarian Intervention And Legitimacy Wars

Humanitarian Intervention and Legitimacy Wars PDF
Author: Richard Falk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317644387
Size: 59.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 224
View: 2381

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In the aftermath of the Cold War there has been a dramatic shift in thinking about the maintenance of peace and security on a global level. This shift is away from a preoccupation with how to prevent major wars between sovereign states to a preoccupation about non-state transnational warfare and violence and strife within states in a world order that continues to be juridically and politically delimited by spatial ideas of national sovereignty and national independence as signified by international boundaries. In this book, Richard Falk draws upon these changes to examine the ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention in the 21st Century. As well as analysing the theoretical and conceptual basis of the responsibility to protect, the book also contains a number of case studies looking at Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo and Syria. The final section explores when humanitarian intervention can succeed and the changing nature of international political legitimacy in countries such as India, Tibet, South Africa and Palestine. This book will be of interest to students of International Relations theory, Peace Studies and Global Politics.

A Review Of Humanitarian Intervention And Legitimacy Wars Seeking Peace And Justice In The 21st Century

A Review of  Humanitarian Intervention and Legitimacy Wars  Seeking Peace and Justice in the 21st Century   PDF
Author: Leah Merchant
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 68.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 3190

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Abstract: In his book Humanitarian Intervention and Legitimacy Wars: Seeking Peace and Justice in the 21st Century, Richard Falk argues that, with the growing prevalence of soft power, historical lessons of asymmetric warfare and legitimacy wars must be taken into account. Falk rejects the realist notion that the state is the only rational actor, offering a more constructivist approach that focuses on the norms, culture and morality of the international community. He asserts that humanitarian intervention is on the decline, and legitimacy wars are increasing. Much of this legitimacy is based on international law and its relevance in the international community

Humanitarian Intervention And Legitimacy Wars

Humanitarian Intervention and Legitimacy Wars PDF
Author: Richard Falk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317644395
Size: 18.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 224
View: 7755

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In the aftermath of the Cold War there has been a dramatic shift in thinking about the maintenance of peace and security on a global level. This shift is away from a preoccupation with how to prevent major wars between sovereign states to a preoccupation about non-state transnational warfare and violence and strife within states in a world order that continues to be juridically and politically delimited by spatial ideas of national sovereignty and national independence as signified by international boundaries. In this book, Richard Falk draws upon these changes to examine the ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention in the 21st Century. As well as analysing the theoretical and conceptual basis of the responsibility to protect, the book also contains a number of case studies looking at Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo and Syria. The final section explores when humanitarian intervention can succeed and the changing nature of international political legitimacy in countries such as India, Tibet, South Africa and Palestine. This book will be of interest to students of International Relations theory, Peace Studies and Global Politics.

Saving Strangers

Saving Strangers PDF
Author: Nicholas J. Wheeler
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191522598
Size: 79.20 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 844

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The extent to which humanitarian intervention has become a legitimate practice in post-cold war international society is the subject of this book. It maps the changing legitimacy of humanitarian intervention by comparing the international response to cases of humanitarian intervention in the cold war and post-cold war periods. Crucially, the book examines how far international society has recognised humanitarian intervention as a legitimate exception to the rules of sovereignty and non-intervention and non-use of force. While there are studies of each case of intervention-in East Pakistan, Cambodia, Uganda, Iraq, Somalia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Kosovo-there is no single work that examines them comprehensively in a comparative framework. Each chapter tells a story of intervention that weaves together a study of motives, justifications and outcomes. The legitimacy of humanitarian intervention is contested by the 'pluralist' and 'solidarist' wings of the English school, and the book charts the stamp of these conceptions on state practice. Solidarism lacks a full-blown theory of humanitarian intervention and the book supplies one. This theory is employed to assess the humanitarian qualifications of the cases of intervention analysed in the book, and this normative assessment is then compared to the moral practices of states. A key focus is to examine how far humanitarian intervention as a legitimate practice is present in the diplomatic dialogue of states. In exploring how far there has been a change of norm in the society of states in the 1990s, the book defends the broad based constructivist claim that state actions will be constrained if they cannot be legitimated, and that new norms enable new practices but do not determine these. The book concludes by considering how far contemporary practices of humanitarian intervention support a new solidarism, and how far this resolves the traditional conflict between order and justice in international society.

Humanitarian Intervention And International Relations

Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations PDF
Author: Jennifer M. Welsh
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191533009
Size: 52.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 239
View: 3700

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Should states use military force for humanitarian purposes? What are the challenges to international society posed by humanitarian intervention in a post-September 11th world? This path-breaking work brings together well-known scholars of law, philosophy, and international relations, together with practitioners who have been actively engaged in intervention during the past decade. Together, this team provides practical and theoretical answers to one of the most burning issues of our day. Case studies include Somalia, Rwanda, the Balkans, and East Timor, as well as the recent US intervention in Afghanistan. The book demonstrates why humanitarian intervention continues to be a controversial issue not only for the United Nations but also for Western states and humanitarian organizations.

Humanitarian Intervention

Humanitarian Intervention PDF
Author: Charles B. Shotwell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 74.18 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Electronic government information
Languages : en
Pages : 4
View: 2916

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Waging Humanitarian War

Waging Humanitarian War PDF
Author: Eric Heinze
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791477088
Size: 64.82 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 220
View: 5382

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Examines the ethical, legal, and political dimensions of military intervention for humanitarian reasons.

War And Democratization

War and Democratization PDF
Author: Wolfgang Merkel
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317990358
Size: 27.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 226
View: 4952

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Promotion of democracy in post-war and post-conflict societies became a topic during the 1990s. The book deals with the legality, legitimacy and effectiveness of military interventions where the international community of states not only felt impelled to engage in military humanitarian or peace-building missions but also in long-term state- and democracy-building. External actors particularly engaged in four modes, namely enforcing democratization by enduring post-war occupation (mode 1); restoring an elected government by military intervention (mode 2); intervening in on-going massacres and civil war with military forces (‘humanitarian intervention’) and thereby curbing the national sovereignty of those countries (mode 3) and forcing democracy on rogue states by ‘democratic intervention’, in other words democracy through war (mode 4). The contributions link juridical and philosophical reflections on just war ad bellum with empirical evidence post bellum in Afghanistan, Georgia, Serbia, Croatia, Cambodia and East Timor. All empirical analyses stress the complexity and difficulties to establish democracy in post-conflict societies driven or monitored by external actors. Such an endeavour implies a comprehensive agenda of political, social, and economic methods of peace-building. However, if external actors withdraw before the roots of democracy are deep enough and before democratic institutions are strong enough to stand alone, then the entire endeavour may fail. This book was originally published as a special issue of Democratization.

Just War And The Responsibility To Protect

Just War and the Responsibility to Protect PDF
Author: Robin Dunford
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.
ISBN: 1786991535
Size: 66.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 926

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Despite the disasters of Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and ever more visible evidence of the horrors of war, the concepts of ‘Humanitarian Intervention’ and ‘Just War’ enjoy widespread legitimacy and continue to exercise an unshakeable grip on our imaginations. Robin Dunford and Michael Neu provide a clear and comprehensive critique of both Just War Theory and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine, deconstructing the philosophical, moral and political arguments that underpin them. In doing so, they show how proponents of Just War and R2P have tended to treat killing in a way which obscures the complex and often messy reality of war, and pays little heed to the human impact of such conflicts. Going further, they provide answers to such difficult questions as ‘Surely it would have been just for us to intervene in the Rwandan genocide?’ An essential guide to one of the most difficult moral and political issues of our age.

Motivations For Humanitarian Intervention

Motivations for Humanitarian intervention PDF
Author: Andreas Krieg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400753748
Size: 58.61 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 136
View: 210

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This Brief sheds light on the motivation of humanitarian intervention from a theoretical and empirical point of view. An in-depth analysis of the theoretical arguments surrounding the issue of a legitimate motivation for humanitarian intervention demonstrate to what extent either altruism or national/self-interests are considered a righteous stimulus. The question about what constitutes a just intervention has been at the core of debates in Just War Theory for centuries. In particular in regards to humanitarian intervention it is oftentimes difficult to define the criteria for a righteous intervention. More than in conventional military interventions, the motivation and intention behind humanitarian intervention is a crucial factor. Whether the humanitarian intervention cases of the post-Cold War era were driven by altruistic or by self-interested considerations is a question is covered within and enables a comprehensive and holistic evaluation of the question of what motivates Western democracies to intervene or to abstain from intervention in humanitarian crises. ​