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Narrowing The Achievement Gap For Native American Students

Narrowing the Achievement Gap for Native American Students PDF
Author: Peggy McCardle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317928210
Size: 43.43 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 220
View: 7633

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There has been much talk and effort focused on the educational achievement gap between white versus black, Hispanic and American Indian students. While there has been some movement the gap has not appreciably narrowed, and it has narrowed the least for Native American students. This volume addresses this disparity by melding evidence-based instruction with culturally sensitive materials and approaches, outlining how we as educators and scientists can pay the educational debt we owe our children. In the tradition of the Native American authors who also contribute to it, this volume will be a series of "stories" that will reveal how the authors have built upon research evidence and linked it with their knowledge of history and culture to develop curricula, materials and methods for instruction of not only Native American students, but of all students. It provides a framework for educators to promote cultural awareness and honor the cultures and traditions that too few people know about. After each major section of the volume, the editors will provide commentary that will give an overview of these chapters and how they model approaches and activities that can be applied to other minority populations, including Blacks, Hispanics, and minority and indigenous groups in nations around the globe.

Narrowing The Achievement Gap For Native American Students

Narrowing the Achievement Gap for Native American Students PDF
Author: Peggy McCardle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317928229
Size: 73.56 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 220
View: 6730

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There has been much talk and effort focused on the educational achievement gap between white versus black, Hispanic and American Indian students. While there has been some movement the gap has not appreciably narrowed, and it has narrowed the least for Native American students. This volume addresses this disparity by melding evidence-based instruction with culturally sensitive materials and approaches, outlining how we as educators and scientists can pay the educational debt we owe our children. In the tradition of the Native American authors who also contribute to it, this volume will be a series of "stories" that will reveal how the authors have built upon research evidence and linked it with their knowledge of history and culture to develop curricula, materials and methods for instruction of not only Native American students, but of all students. It provides a framework for educators to promote cultural awareness and honor the cultures and traditions that too few people know about. After each major section of the volume, the editors will provide commentary that will give an overview of these chapters and how they model approaches and activities that can be applied to other minority populations, including Blacks, Hispanics, and minority and indigenous groups in nations around the globe.

The Achievement Gap In Reading

The Achievement Gap in Reading PDF
Author: Rosalind Horowitz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317699726
Size: 21.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 232
View: 2087

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In this volume prominent scholars, experts in their respective fields and highly skilled in the research they conduct, address educational and reading research from varied perspectives and address what it will take to close the achievement gap—with specific attention to reading. The achievement gap is redefined as a level at which all groups can compete economically in our society and have the literacy tools and habits needed for a good life. Bringing valuable theoretical frameworks and in-depth analytical approaches to interpretation of data, the contributors examine factors that contribute to student achievement inside the school but which are also heavily influenced by out-of-school factors—such as poverty and economics, ethnicity and culture, family and community stratifications, and approaches to measurement of achievement. These out-of-school factors present possibilities for new policies and practice. The overarching theme is that achievement gaps in reading are complex and that multiple perspectives are necessary to address the problem. The breadth and depth of perspectives and content in this volume and its conceptualization of the achievement gap are a significant contribution to the field.

Standing Together

Standing Together PDF
Author: Beverly J. Klug
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 1610487877
Size: 51.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 220
View: 2418

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The majority of American Indian students attend public schools in the United States. However, education mandated for American Indian students since the 1800s has been primarily education for assimilation, with the goal of eliminating American Indian cultures and languages. Indeed, extreme measures were taken to ensure Native students would “act white” as a result of their involvement with Western education. Today’s educational mandates continue a hegemonic “one-size-fits-all” approach to education. This is in spite of evidence that these approaches have rarely worked for Native students and have been extremely detrimental to Native communities. This book provides information about the importance of teaching American Indian students by bridging home and schools, using students’ cultural capital as a springboard for academic success. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy is explored from its earliest beginnings following the 1928 Meriam Report. Successful education of Native students depends on all involved and respect for the voices of American Indians in calling for education that holds high expectations for native students and allows them to be grounded in their cultures and languages.

Narrowing The Achievement Gap In A Re Segregated Urban School District

Narrowing the Achievement Gap in a  Re  Segregated Urban School District PDF
Author: Vivian W. Ikpa
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607523396
Size: 51.73 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 199
View: 3694

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The interplay between sociopolitical forces and economic agendas becomes apparent when one examines the June 28, 2007 United States Supreme Court Decision, Parents Involved In Community Schools v. Seattle School District . In a reversal of the 1954 Brown Decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that public schools could not use race as a factor when assigning children to public schools. Given demographic shifts, globalization, economic instability, and ideological shifts, the reversal was expected. However, it is essential that policymakers, educators, and other stakeholders consider the impact of attending segregated schools on the achievement gap that continues to exist between minority groups and European Americans attending resegregated neighborhood schools. This book will focus on the test score gaps between African American and European American students. The achievement gaps between these two groups will be analyzed will be presented and elaborated. Additionally, the authors will analyze how changes in school characteristics such as: racial composition; school composition; school expenditures, and socio economic level of neighborhoods affect achievement gap trends in the Norfolk School District. An examination of the achievement gap trends in an urban school district will serve to better inform public policy and school reform efforts. The specific goals of this book are to describe the achievement gap between minority AfricanAmerican students and EuropeanAmerican students in the Norfolk school district and to present strategies utilized by urban districts to narrow the gap. One unique feature of this book is that it provides a datadriven researchbased analysis of the achievement gap between minority and EuropeanAmerican students.

The Politics Of Compulsive Education

The Politics of Compulsive Education PDF
Author: Karl Kitching
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317816854
Size: 24.15 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 6576

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The marketised and securitised shaping of formal education sites in terms of risk prevention strategies have transformed what it means to be a learner and a citizen. In this book, Karl Kitching explores racialised dimensions to suggest how individuals and collectives are increasingly made responsible for their own welfare as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ students, at the expense of the protection of their rights as learner-citizens. Focusing on Ireland as a post-colonial Atlantic state, the book demonstrates how liberal governance, racisms, migration and mass education are interconnected and struggled over at local, national, European and global levels. Using a variety of qualitative studies and analytic approaches, The Politics of Compulsive Education details the significance of mass education(s) to the ongoing racialisation of national sovereignty. It draws on in-depth historical, policy, media and school-based research, moving from the 19th century to the present day. Chapters explore diverse themes such as student deportation, austerity and the politics of community ‘integration’, the depoliticisation of third level education via international student and ‘quality’ teacher regimes, the racialised distribution of learner ‘ability’, and school-based bullying and harassment. Combined, these studies demonstrate the possibilities and constraints that exist for educational anti-racisms both in terms of social movements and everyday classroom situations. The Politics of Compulsive Education asks key questions about anti-racist responsibility across multiple education sites and explores how racisms are both shaped, and can be interrupted, by the interaction of the global and the local, as seen in terms of migration, the distribution of capital, media, education policy discourse, and teacher and learner identifications. It will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students of sociology, education, cultural studies, political theory, philosophy and postcolonial studies.

Progress Toward A Literate World

Progress toward a Literate World PDF
Author: Amber Gove
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 111940861X
Size: 12.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 152
View: 5661

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In order to work toward eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals significantly include universal primary education, gender equality, and empowering women. Effective early literacy instruction plays a critical role in achieving these goals. From around the globe, this issue presents evidence-based, culturally sensitive and cost-effective practices in reading instruction and intervention in the early grades. Not only will this issue heighten awareness of the challenges faced but it will provide valuable information to help guide and improve diverse global education programs and research, especially in developing regions and for children living in poverty or disadvantage in all nations. Presenting several experiences from small- and large-scale reading improvement programs, it: Focuses on low- and middle-income countries, Describes challenges in implementing, studying, and scaling them up, Informs expectations on how quickly and easily reading performance can change, and Provides results and evidence of effectiveness. This is the 155th volume in this Jossey-Bass series New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development. Its mission is to provide scientific and scholarly presentations on cutting edge issues and concepts in this subject area. Each volume focuses on a specific new direction or research topic and is edited by experts from that field.

Teachers Unions And Education Reform In Comparative Contexts

Teachers  Unions and Education Reform in Comparative Contexts PDF
Author: Lindsay Whorton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317507789
Size: 57.82 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 272
View: 4955

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Teachers’ unions have long been controversial and divisive organizations, but criticism and distrust of them may be at an all-time high. This volume considers the prevailing assumption that unions successfully block change in education because they are primarily motivated to protect members’ interests. It challenges the conceptualization of teacher union motivation and provides a more nuanced account of unions’ interests, power and impact. Through a series of international cases from the United States, Finland and the Canton of Zürich, this volume examines the hot-button issue of performance-related pay reform and compensation. It argues that a better understanding of the union-management relationship may be the key to securing more meaningful change and reform. It will be of use to scholars, policy-makers, union leaders, teachers and citizens who are interested in the possibilities for the union-management relationship, rather than the limitations.

Pedagogy Praxis And Purpose In Education

Pedagogy  Praxis and Purpose in Education PDF
Author: C.M. Mulcahy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317932897
Size: 53.25 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 200
View: 2926

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Recent years have shown the growth of federal legislation and programs having a profound impact on educational policy and practice, and a decline in reliance on broadly based educational justifications. Paralleling this development has been the emergence of well-endowed and influential private foundations, and an increase in corporate influence in shaping policy. In this volume the authors consider the discourse, rhetoric, and underlying values that sustain these developments alongside those that underlie more longstanding and competing educational theories and practices. This volume highlights the importance of recognizing opposing conceptualizations of education—some more educationally productive than others— and their core values, approaches to student learning, strengths and weaknesses, and justification. The authors analyze and critique what Jane Roland Martin has referred to as ‘the deep structure of educational thought’, and seek improved educational policy and practice with particular reference to curriculum and pedagogy. It features a comparative analysis of competing discourses including autocratic control, limited personal development, and praxis.

The Students Of Sherman Indian School

The Students of Sherman Indian School PDF
Author: Diana Meyers Bahr
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806145145
Size: 57.17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 3235

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Sherman Indian High School, as it is known today, began in 1892 as Perris Indian School on eighty acres south of Riverside, California, with nine students. Its mission, like that of other off-reservation Indian boarding schools, was to "civilize" Indian children, which meant stripping them of their Native culture and giving them vocational training. This book offers the first full history of Sherman Indian School’s 100-plus years, a history that reflects federal Indian education policy since the late nineteenth century.