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Plateau Indians And The Quest For Spiritual Power 1700 1850

Plateau Indians and the Quest for Spiritual Power  1700 1850 PDF
Author: Larry Cebula
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803203099
Size: 77.17 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 189
View: 1389

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Fusing myriad primary and secondary sources, historian Larry Cebula offers a compelling master narrative of the impact of Christianity on the Columbian Plateau peoples in the Pacific Northwest from 1700 to 1850. ø For the Native peoples of the Columbian Plateau, the arrival of whites was understood primarily as a spiritual event, calling for religious explanations. Between 1700 and 1806, Native peoples of the Columbian Plateau experienced the presence of whites indirectly through the arrival of horses, some trade goods by long-distance exchange, and epidemic diseases that decimated their population and shook their faith in their religious beliefs. Many responded by participating in the Prophet Dance movement to restore their frayed links to the spirit world. ø When whites arrived in the early nineteenth century, the Native peoples of the Columbian Plateau were more concerned with learning about white people's religious beliefs and spiritual power than with acquiring their trade goods; trading posts were seen as windows into another world rather than sources of goods. The whites? strange appearance and seeming immunity to disease and the unique qualities of their goods and technologies suggested great spiritual power to the Native peoples. But disillusionment awaited: Catholic and Protestant missionaries came to teach the Native peoples about Christianity, yet these white spiritual practices failed to protect them from a new round of epidemic disease. By 1850, with their world devastatingly altered, most Plateau Indians had rejected Christianity

At The Bridge

At the Bridge PDF
Author: Wendy Wickwire
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774861541
Size: 51.51 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 400
View: 3322

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At the Bridge chronicles the little-known story of James Teit, a prolific ethnographer who, from 1884 to 1922, worked with and advocated for the Indigenous peoples of British Columbia and the northwestern United States. From his base at Spences Bridge, BC, Teit forged a participant-based anthropology that was far ahead of its time. Whereas his contemporaries, including famed anthropologist Franz Boas, studied Indigenous peoples as members of “dying cultures,” Teit worked with them as members of living cultures resisting colonial influence over their lives and lands. Whether recording stories, mapping place-names, or participating in the chiefs’ fight for fair treatment, he made their objectives his own. With his allies, he produced copious, meticulous records; an army of anthropologists could not have achieved a fraction of what he achieved in his short life. Wickwire’s beautifully crafted narrative accords Teit the status he deserves, consolidating his place as a leading and innovative anthropologist in his own right.

Peoples Of The Plateau

Peoples of the Plateau PDF
Author: Steven L. Grafe
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806137421
Size: 10.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 221
View: 6617

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"This book marks the first major examination of Moorhouse and his work. Featuring eighty plates, it not only showcases Moorhouse's extensive photographs but also tells the story of the man and of the world in which he lived and worked."--BOOK JACKET.

The Oxford Handbook Of American Indian History

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History PDF
Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019985890X
Size: 21.36 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 240
View: 5588

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"Everything you know about Indians is wrong." As the provocative title of Paul Chaat Smith's 2009 book proclaims, everyone knows about Native Americans, but most of what they know is the fruit of stereotypes and vague images. The real people, real communities, and real events of indigenous America continue to elude most people. The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History confronts this erroneous view by presenting an accurate and comprehensive history of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. Thirty-two leading experts, both Native and non-Native, describe the historical developments of the past 500 years in American Indian history, focusing on significant moments of upheaval and change, histories of indigenous occupation, and overviews of Indian community life. The first section of the book charts Indian history from before 1492 to European invasions and settlement, analyzing US expansion and its consequences for Indian survival up to the twenty-first century. A second group of essays consists of regional and tribal histories. The final section illuminates distinctive themes of Indian life, including gender, sexuality and family, spirituality, art, intellectual history, education, public welfare, legal issues, and urban experiences. A much-needed and eye-opening account of American Indians, this Handbook unveils the real history often hidden behind wrong assumptions, offering stimulating ideas and resources for new generations to pursue research on this topic.

The Last Indian War

The Last Indian War PDF
Author: Elliott West
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199831033
Size: 17.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 432
View: 1667

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This newest volume in Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments series offers an unforgettable portrait of the Nez Perce War of 1877, the last great Indian conflict in American history. It was, as Elliott West shows, a tale of courage and ingenuity, of desperate struggle and shattered hope, of short-sighted government action and a doomed flight to freedom. To tell the story, West begins with the early history of the Nez Perce and their years of friendly relations with white settlers. In an initial treaty, the Nez Perce were promised a large part of their ancestral homeland, but the discovery of gold led to a stampede of settlement within the Nez Perce land. Numerous injustices at the hands of the US government combined with the settlers' invasion to provoke this most accomodating of tribes to war. West offers a riveting account of what came next: the harrowing flight of 800 Nez Perce, including many women, children and elderly, across 1500 miles of mountainous and difficult terrain. He gives a full reckoning of the campaigns and battles--and the unexpected turns, brilliant stratagems, and grand heroism that occurred along the way. And he brings to life the complex characters from both sides of the conflict, including cavalrymen, officers, politicians, and--at the center of it all--the Nez Perce themselves (the Nimiipuu, "true people"). The book sheds light on the war's legacy, including the near sainthood that was bestowed upon Chief Joseph, whose speech of surrender, "I will fight no more forever," became as celebrated as the Gettysburg Address. Based on a rich cache of historical documents, from government and military records to contemporary interviews and newspaper reports, The Last Indian War offers a searing portrait of a moment when the American identity--who was and who was not a citizen--was being forged.

American Indians Of The Plateau And Plains

American Indians of the Plateau and Plains PDF
Author: Britannica Educational Publishing
Publisher: Britannica Educational Publishing
ISBN: 161530715X
Size: 39.94 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
Languages : en
Pages : 160
View: 6060

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The use of horses has perhaps most dramatically shaped the way of life for Native American tribes in the Plateau and Plains regions of North America, but the practices and traditions of both culture areas date back to a time long before Europeans ever touched American shores, introducing their animals and customs to the continent’s indigenous peoples. This captivating volume examines the history and cross-cultural interactions that came to be associated with the peoples of the Plateau and the changing settlement patterns of the Plains peoples, as well as the cultural, social, and spiritual practices that have defined the major tribes of each region.

History Of American Indians Exploring Diverse Roots

History of American Indians  Exploring Diverse Roots PDF
Author: Robert R. McCoy
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313386838
Size: 29.36 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 257
View: 1822

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A comprehensive look at the entirety of Native American history, focusing particularly on native peoples within the geographic boundaries of the United States. • Provides readers with a synopsis of the most current findings on the prehistory of American Indians • Creates a comprehensive narrative of American Indian history • Presents extensive coverage of the history of the American West and Pacific Northwest • Addresses topics that are often overlooked in other narratives, such as the American Indian's role in the Civil War • Covers contemporary American Indian life and culture

Indigenous Knowledge And The Environment In Africa And North America

Indigenous Knowledge and the Environment in Africa and North America PDF
Author: David M. Gordon
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 0821444115
Size: 79.61 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 368
View: 4677

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Indigenous knowledge has become a catchphrase in global struggles for environmental justice. Yet indigenous knowledges are often viewed, incorrectly, as pure and primordial cultural artifacts. This collection draws from African and North American cases to argue that the forms of knowledge identified as “indigenous” resulted from strategies to control environmental resources during and after colonial encounters. At times indigenous knowledges represented a “middle ground” of intellectual exchanges between colonizers and colonized; elsewhere, indigenous knowledges were defined through conflict and struggle. The authors demonstrate how people claimed that their hybrid forms of knowledge were communal, religious, and traditional, as opposed to individualist, secular, and scientific, which they associated with European colonialism. Indigenous Knowledge and the Environment offers comparative and transnational insights that disturb romantic views of unchanging indigenous knowledges in harmony with the environment. The result is a book that informs and complicates how indigenous knowledges can and should relate to environmental policy-making. Contributors: David Bernstein, Derick Fay, Andrew H. Fisher, Karen Flint, David M. Gordon, Paul Kelton, Shepard Krech III, Joshua Reid, Parker Shipton, Lance van Sittert, Jacob Tropp, James L. A. Webb, Jr., Marsha Weisiger

Hang Them All

 Hang Them All  PDF
Author: Donald L. Cutler
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806156260
Size: 37.89 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 392
View: 537

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Col. George Wright’s campaign against the Yakima, Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Palouse, and other Indian peoples of eastern Washington Territory was intended to punish them for a recent attack on another U.S. Army force. Wright had once appeared to respect the Indians of the Upper Columbia Plateau, but in 1858 he led a brief war noted for its violence, bloodshed, and summary trials and executions. Today, many critics view his actions as war crimes, but among white settlers and politicians of the time, Wright was a patriotic hero who helped open the Inland Northwest to settlement. “Hang Them All” offers a comprehensive account of Wright’s campaigns and explores the controversy surrounding his legacy. Over thirty days, Wright’s forces defeated a confederation of Plateau warriors in two battles, destroyed their food supplies, slaughtered animals, burned villages, took hostages, and ordered the hanging of sixteen prisoners. Seeking the reasons for Wright’s turn toward mercilessness, Cutler asks hard questions: If Wright believed he was limiting further bloodshed, why were his executions so gruesomely theatrical and cruel? How did he justify destroying food supplies and villages and killing hundreds of horses? Was Wright more violent than his contemporaries, or did his actions reflect a broader policy of taking Indian lands and destroying Native cultures? Stripped of most of their territory, the Plateau tribes nonetheless survived and preserved their cultures. With Wright’s reputation called into doubt, some northwesterners question whether an army fort and other places in the region should be named for him. Do historically based names honor an undeserving murderer, or prompt a valuable history lesson? In examining contemporary and present-day treatments of Wright and the incident, “Hang Them All” adds an important, informed voice to this continuing debate.

Shadow Tribe

Shadow Tribe PDF
Author: Andrew H. Fisher
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295801972
Size: 44.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 320
View: 7336

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Shadow Tribe offers the first in-depth history of the Pacific Northwest�s Columbia River Indians -- the defiant River People whose ancestors refused to settle on the reservations established for them in central Oregon and Washington. Largely overlooked in traditional accounts of tribal dispossession and confinement, their story illuminates the persistence of off-reservation Native communities and the fluidity of their identities over time. Cast in the imperfect light of federal policy and dimly perceived by non-Indian eyes, the flickering presence of the Columbia River Indians has followed the treaty tribes down the difficult path marked out by the forces of American colonization. Based on more than a decade of archival research and conversations with Native people, Andrew Fisher�s groundbreaking book traces the waxing and waning of Columbia River Indian identity from the mid-nineteenth through the late twentieth centuries. Fisher explains how, despite policies designed to destroy them, the shared experience of being off the reservation and at odds with recognized tribes forged far-flung river communities into a loose confederation called the Columbia River Tribe. Environmental changes and political pressures eroded their autonomy during the second half of the twentieth century, yet many River People continued to honor a common heritage of ancestral connection to the Columbia, resistance to the reservation system, devotion to cultural traditions, and detachment from the institutions of federal control and tribal governance. At times, their independent and uncompromising attitude has challenged the sovereignty of the recognized tribes, earning Columbia River Indians a reputation as radicals and troublemakers even among their own people. Shadow Tribe is part of a new wave of historical scholarship that shows Native American identities to be socially constructed, layered, and contested rather than fixed, singular, and unchanging. From his vantage point on the Columbia, Fisher has written a pioneering study that uses regional history to broaden our understanding of how Indians thwarted efforts to confine and define their existence within narrow reservation boundaries.